Le Défi Français 2000

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Le Défi Français 2000 Expand

6ème Sens, Le Défi Français Half hull from America's cup.

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$295.00

Hand-crafted plank-on-frame wood hull with orange and blue paint and logo graphics Mounted on 5mm plexiglas.

Hull size: 60cm.

Board size: 75cm X 20cm

Size75 cm L x 20 cm Hgh
Year2000
Half Hull SizeMedium (75cm X 20cm)

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Le Défi Français 2000

Le Défi Français 2000

1999 sees a new challenge structure with a dynamic, resourceful and youthful syndicate. Originally called "Yaka," ( French slang for 'just do it' ) the syndicate is the brainchild of Luc Gellusseau and Pierre Mas, of Corum Sailing Team fame.

Gellusseau who now runs the technical and design team, has managed to group together the best bits of the previous French challenges along with a large quantity of new, young talent. He and Mas realised that it was important to stay out of French national politics and to that end the syndicate is a relatively small budget operation.The sponsorship was supplied early by two technology companies, Bouygues Telecom and Transiciel. Le Defi, as it is now called, only dreamt of building one boat and are well organised, completely transparent and very motivated.

Bertrand Pacé is at the helm of the boat "6eme sens"Thierry Pepponet is tactician and the well-respected Dutchman Marcel van Triest is navigator. Pacé, undoubtly France's most talented helmsman today, is a top ranked match racer - world champion in 1994 and runner-up in 1998 - commands huge loyalty amongst his crew and is mature in his approach after three Cups.The "6eme sens" boat design team includes such notables as Bernard Nivelt and Daniel Andrieu along with other names from the French world of composite structures and aerodynamics.

The stated goal of the French Team was to do a good and to get to the Louis Vuitton semi-finals.They succeeded with their victory against America one, and reached to an honorable 6th rank. See also "6eme Sens" half hull.

The Concordia yawl was designed in 1938 by naval architect C. Raymond Hunt with input from Llewellyn and Waldo Howland, Clinton Crane, Fenwick Williams and Frank Paine.

Earlier that year Llewellyn Howland's family's Colin Archer designed Norwegian pilot cutter, Escape, was destroyed by the Great Hurricane of 1938. Llewellyn commissioned the Concordia Company, which he had founded in 1926 and at the time run by his son Waldo, to design and build a replacement. Llewellyn wanted a sailboat that could be used for both cruising and racing and withstand the heavy wind and choppy waters of Buzzards Bay.

What was created was Concordia design number fourteen, a 39'10" yawl that would become one of the most successful yawls in history. There were 103 Concordias produced between 1938 and 1966, making the Concordia yawl class the largest class of large one-design wooden sailboats.The first four Concordias were produced in Massachusetts. Concordia commissioned the Abeking and Rasmussen shipyard in Lemwerder, Germany to build the last 99.

All 103 Concordias are still in existents today.

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